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20121130
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jose and more rain. i will see you back here. >> thank you. ktvu's john fowler is live where the fast moving rain hit first. john? >> reporter: we are in a cool spot and clear spot. i can see stars. temperatures here 49 degrees. i want to look that lights of san francisco. you can see how clear it is. that means it will be cold. all day long we were watching rain showers through the bay area. >> series of showers pelted the bay area after yesterday's 70s. today cold and wet was a surprise. >> it just changed all of a sudden. crazy. >> reporter: do you like it? >> we need the rain. >> reporter: not these drivers who rashed on 101 this afternoon. the chp was urging drivers to slow down. traffic snarled on surface streets. rain caught drivers off guard. >> i don't think they know what they are doing. so many accidents. >> reporter: the change in weather came at a bad time for some. >> i have a cold. the rain doesn't agree with the cold. >> reporter: we found construction workers who say they got lucky. >> we got halved a day hof so we are -- half a day off so we are glad. >> reporter: ri
fire damage but almost nobody had flood insurance. reporting live. john fowler. ktvu. >> the storm that sent wave across the east coast is being felt by relief agency offices in the bay area. fema's area 9 is head quartered here in oakland. so far a ten person team was sent to help with sandy relief efforts. emergency supplies from the moffet field depot could also be shipped east. 30 red cross volunteers the bay area have deployed to help and up to 100 more could leave in the coming days. the red cross is asking you to pitch in by donating blood. >> it's one of the most concrete things i can do because i graduated college two years ago and financially that's not really -- i can't give money but i can give blood. >> red cross leaders say blood is needed because power outages have forced the cancellations of blood drives on the east coast. >> we have source now spreading south out of the north bay. here we have the golden gate bridge. rain in nevado, in santa rosa, in napa. the satellite or radar loop, you can see that rain moving in over the peninsula. reports of rain out in oce
of california's death penalty. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is here with a look. >> reporter: a moral, ethical and economic debate, does the death penalty help protect us? >> reporter: prop 34 would repeal the death penalty. instituting life without parole. retroactive for the 725 right now. a 17% undecided. but a trend just the last two weeks, yes, jumped 4 points to 45%. could prop 34 pass? >> that is unknown at this point but it stands a better chance today than three weeks ago. >> reporter: the cost argument, $100 million a year to keep it. there are strong arguments on both sides. >> what is the right punishment for the evil? it isn't just about the killer. >> it is about public policy. how do we spend, what keeps us safer? >> yes, it is cheaper to lock them up than to execute them. >> we waste a bunch of money either way. >> reporter: our poll found religious differences. catholics favorites it. prodstants oppose it -- pausestants oppose it. the bay area supports repealing the death penalty. southern areas of the state oppose it. don't forget to vote tuesday. health and
killed birds and sea life around the bay. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler investigates the lessons learned and what still needs to be done. >> reporter: on a foggy morning, the harbor pilot plowed into the bay bridge, spilling 53,000 gallons of fuel oil. critics say the government response was slow. >> it was a minor spill but they allowed it to get away. >> reporter: the oil fouled shorelines in and out of the bay. 6,000 birds died. lack of data kept them from knowing the full extent of damage. >> not a lot of research so we don't know how well it was covered. >> reporter: we toured the area today for a first hand look. >> reporter: since the spill they have made changes. ships can't leave without less than a half mile visibility and oil spill notification is somewhat improved. >> i don't think that we are prepared to respond quickly enough. >> reporter: 5 years ago the port finally called in fishing boats to spread oil booms, and today says they are ready to help again but no one is organizing any volunteers and the group that saved so many old birds -- >> -- oiled bi
's health and science editor john fowler joins us how with how it works. >> reporter: doctors say pulses can undo depression. gloomy weather, shorter day light can trigger depression. >> reporter: 1-10 american adults live with major depression. >> i struggled with depression for a long time. since i was a child. >> reporter: two years of medications weren't working. >> it wreaked havoc on my life. my husband left and i had lots of terrible things going on. >> a gradual increasing down hill course with more frequent episodes and more severe. >> reporter: this summer he began this ground breaking therapy. tms. this fda approved machine focuses pulses into one area. >> when it moves over the nerves it induces activity. >> reporter: that activates the brain's system that controls mood, restoring balance and neuro transmitters. regulating depressed brain activity without drugs. >> to be more active without having to be invasive. >> changed my life. first thing that ever successfully got me to a place where it is not something i need to manage. >> reporter: the cost about $10,000 is now covered b
of interest. >>> set back for a business. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler traveled to drakes bay. >> reporter: a gray and gloomy day at drake's bay. oyster farm is ending. suddenly ordered to close tomorrow. >> disbelief. a combination that create as shock. >> reporter: he says he phoned him today. he was stunned. the park lease is over. family business gone. 30 people out of work. >> this will have a profound effect. >> reporter: customers also stunned. >> so sad that now this will not happen anymore. we could see the last people. >> reporter: a study claims the farm harms marine mammals. the company is considering legal action. it has gotten praise for jobs. he loses his job of 30 years tomorrow. his wife, three children and 15 other families must leave their homes. >> i feel bad. >> reporter: what are you going to do? >> i don't know. >> the company cannot relocate. and the loss of oysters will force up prices. >> this will be a crushing blow to seafood production in california. >> reporter: this area where sir frances drake landed is now to be california's first federally de
a favor in return. john fowler reports on the add -- additional groups in california and what they will find. >> reporter: 50 workers flew out today, 50 more tomorrow totaling 250 workers and 100 trucks that as yet another storm bears down on the devastated east coast. >> there's still about 150 million people without power. >> reporter: new york staten island hit exceptionally hard. four days without gasoline or electricity. >> you're going to die, you don't understand you have to get your truck here on this corner, now. >> reporter: i reached pg & e trucks, they said that the main concern is hospitals and health care centers. >> we have the election, our opportunity to exercise our rights to vote and that's kind of a big deal. >> reporter: i also phoned 37- year-old tarson a san franciscan who moved to find work. he said he had to work 30 blocks just to charge his phone. >> it's like a ghost town. it's very eerie. the only sounds that i hear are sirens. >> reporter: buss are now not running after sunset. the streets empty saved for police, a few taxis and roaming teenagers.
billion from the federal government. >> new at 6:00, john fowler is live at fisherman's wharf, john? >> reporter: the catch won't come in actually for five to six hours, yet, i'll tell you why. the crew here of the amigo and other boats are getting ready to bring in that catch, some 40 boats have already taken thousands out to sea. all day, bay area fishermen hurried to load their boats with these. veteran larry collins hopes for a good season. >> we are getting the gear out, set and we are going to work. >> reporter: and in spectacular weather. dropping them off shore and haul them in after midnight. our cameras were there early this morning after distributors and fishermen settled on a higher price than last year. three dollars. retail a little over $6 a pound for fresh crab for fresh crab an thanksgiving. >> >> good buy. >> a little pricey at fisherman's wharf, craig said he comes here every year. >> i drove three hours to come here and have a $32 crab because there is nothing like it. >> fresh local crab coming in. price dropped quite a bit, the crab season is really good. reund
. it helps so much. >> that was john fowler reporting in vallejo. >> the owners of a bus company are facing federal charges of tax fraud. the three owners of quality assurance travel were charged earlier this week according to the u.s. department of justice. the indictment alleges the company reported check payments on its corporate tax returns but didn't report cash payments. >> city and state leaders within on hand to break ground on a new freeway project in the south bay. the project to overhaul the interstate 280-880 interchange. crews will widen the onramp from southbound 880 and later build a directling to the valley fair shopping center. a fly over ramp is scheduled to be complete by next summer. >> intell has launched a new more powerful chip that uses less energy. the new chip offers twice the power but uses 8% less energy while in use. intel says the chip is more reliable. the new product release didn't seem to help their stock. shares actually slipped today to close just under $21 per share. >> the santa clara district attorney's office is warning people to beware of superstorm s
phones close and away from pickpockets but some say it's putting women's lives at risk. >> john fowler investigates cases of breast cancer in women who carry their cell phones underneath their shirts. thank you for trusting ktvu channel 2 news. #úfó when i take a picture of this check, it goes straight to the bank. oh. oh look the lion is out! no mommy no! don't worry honey, it only works on checks. deposit checks from your smartphone with chase quickdeposit. just snap a picture, hit send and done. take a step forward and chase what matters. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. get a free wireless receiver with a qua
the hungry are getting fed this thanksgiving. john fowler is inside this unusual feast that has become a holiday tradition. >> reporter: since i first told you about this at 5, the wait here at avatar's restaurant in sausalito has now grown to about an hour. people are here for a 24-year tradition of free sit-down pre- thanksgiving meals, including all the trimmings and wine and beer as well. now, it's not quite the thanksgiving treat that you might expect. this is something very special. the family here has been doing this for 24 years. the idea is they want to give something back to their neighborhood. right now i have with me kumar. 1100 meals, and you've been doing this 24 years? >> it's been 24 years that we've been doing this, and look at what i get out of it. it's all a blessing, the people, and we're so happy. >> and you have a wonderful amount of food here. >> this is a turkey enchilada and a pumpkin enchilada, a really popular dinner with us and everybody is enjoying it. >> reporter: people really seem to appreciate it. what do you think of the meal? >> it's fantastic, absolu
planet. ktvu health and science editor john fowler will have details on why the head of nasa is calling the discovery earth shaking. >>> thank you for trusting ktvu channel 2 news, we will see you next time news breaks, be sure to join us again at 5:00. we are always here for you at ktvu.com and mobile ktvu.com, have a happy thanks giving. send comments to comments@captioncolorado.com captions by terry james, caption colorado, llc.
. health and science editor john fowler, ktvu news. >>> agriculture inspectors have discovered a tiny insect that could harm california's citrus crop. the insect can carry a disease that has destroyed crops in florida. the department of agriculture is expected to release quarantine plans as early as tomorrow. >>> the white house has released this photo of the president and romney shaking hands. >>> over the strong objections of the united states, the u.n. voted to give rights to palestine. the united nations general assembly voted by a 2/3 majority to recognize the state of palestine. secretary of the state hillary clinton called vote counter productive. >>> a s.w.a.t. team surrounded the home of joseph francis quarry. officers rushed cory when he had come outside of his house to take in his dogs. >>> today actress lindsay lohan faces new charges. the 26-year-old faces third degree charges. showing you here lohan leaving the police station hidden under a jacket. lohan was charged for three misdemeanors in an accident where her porsche crashed. >>> the marin independent journey says a
power. john fowler here now with more startling pictures of the damage and also word of more evacuations. >> reporter: we have just learned 700 patients new york's bellevue hospital are being evacuated right now because of flooding and power failures. late word that the airport could reopen tomorrow morning. still clearing skies today brought a sobering reality. shocking damage becoming clear today. the new jersey shore, whole neighborhoods swallowed. block after block of shattered homes, shaken survivors. >> trying to get out of a window. you are up to your neck in water. it's freezing, the wind is blowing. >> reporter: national guard troops today still rescuing thousands of displaced. >> saying two days before power and i lot of the first. >>> . >> reporter: the president and new jersey governor met with residents. >> i don't know where to go. i don't know what to do. >> reporter: many have no flood insurance. the water remains. with power out likely for days yet gas stations rationing fueln. manhattan traffic is moving but power still out at underpasses flooded. subways may reopen
's glad for help because some day california may need a favor in return. john fowler reports on the add -- additional groups in california and what they will find. >> reporter: 50 workers flew out today, 50 more tomorrow totaling 250 workers and 100 trucks that as yet another storm bears down on the devastated east coast. >> there's still about 150 million people without power. >> reporter: new york staten island hit exceptionally hard. four days without gasoline or electricity. >> you're going to die, you don't understand you have to get your truck here on this corner, now. >> reporter: i reached pg & e trucks, they said that the main concern is hospitals and health care centers. >> we have the election, our opportunity to exercise our rights to vote and that's kind of a big deal. >> reporter: i also phoned 37- year-old tarson a san franciscan who moved to find work. he said he had to work 30 blocks just to charge his phone. >> it's like a ghost town. it's very eerie. the only sounds that i hear are sirens. >> reporter: buss are now not running after sunset. the streets empty saved for
with john fowler in the newsroom. he is monitoring some of the national issues including gay marriage. >> reporter: we may have history made tonight. the first state to approve same sex marriage by popular vote could come this evening. maine is the first state to put it on the ballot. maryland and washington voters are -- asked to overturn it done by legislators. minnesota voters asked to change the constitution to define it as between a man and woman. six states have legalized it by legislation or court order. this is maryland earlier this year. 32 states have previously rejected gay marriage, proponents say they have been encouraged by national polling. 49% favor same sex marriage. maryland's turn out reported as very heavy. early returns just into the newsroom, 52% are approving same sex marriage. in maine, 53% approving it. minnesota no returns yet. the results in washington may not be known until the end of the week because of late mail in ballots. reporting live. >> now in addition to election results, reporters watching voter turn out, analysts have predict that fewer people w
and science editor, john fowler, here with a decidedly nontraditional food event. >> reporter: we're in avatar's in sausalito. and we're here for a 24-year tradition started by the man whose photo you can see right there. avatar was the founder of this restaurant. he decided many years ago that it would be a great idea, on the thanksgiving eve, to offer free sit-down turkey dinners to anybody who wanted to come. now, the idea here is that anyone who wants to come can do this. last year, they had over 1100 people come here and get a free sit-down meal and drink. right now, this is kumar. this is your restaurant. it's a small restaurant. how can you afford to do this? >> well, if you believe in faith and god and the community, this is how it works. and once you do it, it works. we were supposed to open at 4:00. but we did 3:00 and the people started coming. as you can see, the people are loving it. >> you also have a lot of volunteers? >> bartenders, waitresses, they're all working. >> and the food is somewhat unusual. these are pumpkin and turkey enchiladas, not your usual thanksgiving fare. ma
by the mars rover curiosity. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler joins us now with why the details are delayed. >> reporter: well, nasa researchers are going to be refining their data for presentation. the rover is about to rewrite the book on mars. >> reporter: after the landing, then sampling the soil and land, scientists promise to make public a historic discovery. >> it was a great teaser. the word earth shaking was used. >> reporter: he is not involved where the mission but points out nasa designed curiosity to find organic molecules. the building blocks of life. >> they are going to be -- rewrite the book discoveries if we see what we hope to find. >> reporter: curiosity discovered solid evidence water once flowed where it landed. liquid water may exist below the surface. could curiosity have discovered life itself? >> the only life it could detect is something that walked in front of the camera. >> reporter: that would indeed would be amazing. but curiosity doesn't have the equipment to confirm the presence of life. but we could expect details at a san francisco conference t
of the bay area adding to the bay area risk. john fowler has what they know and they don't. >> reporter: the risk of breast cancer is 10 to 20% higher than state average, the big question is why. researchers track breast cancer neighborhood by neighborhood. and found among the state's highest risks neighborhoods ring in the bay. >> that's scary, i want to show why. >> environment, environmental immaterial pact. >> reporter: it's southern sonoma, western contra costa and alameda counties, western santa clara and san mateo county, not san francisco. but eastern marin county where there's already active research on breast cancer clusters. >> it's an opportunity to look at those areas, all those areas and see what's different and what's similar. >> reporter: barlow and researchers say they did not find a common cause. delayed childbirth, bottled water have all been proposed for the elevated risk. >> if it's all over the bay area the important thing is to look at environmental causes. >> reporter: activists say this new study should trigger cause for action by local health agencies. research
to shut down. ktvu science editor john fowler says how the decision came from the president's organization. >> reporter: after almost a century on these pristine waters, -- his family business gone. 30 businesses instantly out of work. customers also stunned. >> it's so sad that now this will not happen anymore. we could very well be the last people. >> reporter: we showed you secretary salazar visiting. there were no public hearings. it's gotten praise for sustainability, low environmental impact and jobs in rural marine. juan and jorge mata loses his job tomorrow. his wife and other families living on the property are going to have to move out of their home. >> i feel bad. >> reporter: what are you going to do? >> i don't know. >> reporter: it will force up prices. >> this will be a crushing blow to seafood production in california. >> reporter: this area where sir francis drake first landed 433 years ago is now to be california's first federally designated marine wilderness area. at drake's, john fowler. >>> san francisco is ready to celebrate should marriage become legal once again in
owned oyster company is being forced to shut down. ktvu science editor john fowler says how the decision came from the president's organization. >> reporter: after almost a century on these pristine waters, -- his family business gone. 30 businesses instantly out of work. customers also stunned. >> it's so sad that now this will not happen anymore. we could very well be the last people. >> reporter: we showed you secretary salazar visiting. there were no public hearings. it's gotten praise for sustainability, low environmental impact and jobs in rural marine. juan and jorge mata loses his job tomorrow. his wife and other families living on the property are going to have to move out of their home. >> i feel bad. >> reporter: what are you going to do? >> i don't know. >> reporter: it will force up prices. >> this will be a crushing blow to seafood production in california. >> reporter: this area where sir francis drake first landed 433 years ago is now to be california's first federally designated marine wilderness area. at drake's, john fowler. >>> san francisco is ready to celebrate shou
. health and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. [ music playing ] >>> live storm tracker 2, we see the showers and you can see in the mountains, the purple up here here, snow falling around the foothills. heavy snow and it is coming down to 3,000 feet in the next few hour. closer now. you will see the rain moving into san jose right now. the san francisco commute. we are seeing shower activity south towards san jose. it is light right now. half moon bay, showers up there as well. this scattered showers activity, this area, this area, west side of san jose swings through the bay area. more untable weather. cool air. -- unstable weather. cool air. expecting snow level down to 3500 feet. it is a cold one and not going away. i will have more details in a few minutes. >> coming up, we will take you up to the sierra where it is snowing right now. one news crew says they got stuck today because of the snow. we will hear from them in 9 minutes. >>> student protest wrapped up at university of california at berkeley today. they want tuition cut now that prop 30 passed. ktvu's sal castane
an extramarital affair. as john fowler reports, lawmakers questioned the four star general about the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in libya. >> reporter: retired general petraeus apologized to lawmakers for his apair that led to his resignation last week. reveals a military culture of sexual corruption. >> i'm deeply, deeply disappointed in former general petraeus' actions. the jury is still out on what general allen did. but when it's happening at the top you know it's corrupting all the way down the chain. >> reporter: the investigation was questioning the attack in benghazi. specifically what the white house knew and when. >> it added to our ability to make judgments about what is clearly a failure of intelligence. >> in talking points to the un that the attacks were spontaneous. >> the key is if they were undocumenting talking points at a very early stage. >> reporter: lawmakers today said the original cia talking points refer to al-qaida as responsible that was somehow deleted. now congress wants to know who eliminated that reference and why. >>> the two women at the center of the petra
's important to ride defensively, know the rules, and stay lit, and visible. john fowler, ktvu, channel 2 news. >>> american suzuki motor corporation announced today it would stop selling automobiles in this country. the company filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. documents show it owes at least $100 million to at least $500 million. american suzuki said it will still sell motorcycles, all- terrain vehicles and boat engines. >>> a nonprofit presented a big check today to the widow of kenyan youngstromb. karen was in walnut creek to accept the check worth more than $26,000. the group collected donations from individuals and businesses, including chevron, and ktvu and kicu. our general manager tom mapone was among those at the ceremony. officer youngstromb was shot and killed during a traffic stop on 280 two months ago. >> how dearly loved their father was by even, not just those that knew him personally. >> one of officer youngstromb's four children will also qualify for a scholarship. the group helps families of fallen firefighters and peace officers who die in the line of duty. >>> the world tra
. there are advances, but also charges of crony im, plus growing frustration. tonight, john fowler investigates the stem cell promise and pay off. >> reporter: he says he will walk again and he knows how. >> stem cells are going to get me out of the chair. i will walk again one day, because of stem cell research. >> reporter: reed, a paraplegic since a college football injury. voters believed stem cells might cure paralysis, heart disease, you name it. and gave stern 3 billion taxpayer dollars. imagine a stock of dollar bills as high as the orbiting space station. bond men to find stem cell cures. jonathan thomas told me the $1.7 billion september to date built a dozen new laboratories. funded 1200 papers on curable diseases, and lured to california, 150 top scientists. backing the seven clinical trials, but the fda has not approved even one stem cell therapy. 6 months ago, the doctors got the okay to use a canadian treatment for dying children. >> it's really the new era of regenerative medicine. >> reporter: critics say it's not what voters had hoped for. >> when you have, for example the hea
of crony im, plus growing frustration. tonight, john fowler investigates the stem cell promise and pay off. >> reporter: he says he will walk again and he knows how. >> stem cells are going to get me out of the chair. i will walk again one day, because of stem cell research. >> reporter: reed, a paraplegic since a college football injury. voters believed stem cells might cure paralysis, heart disease, you name it. and gave stern 3 billion taxpayer dollars. imagine a stock of dollar bills as high as the orbiting space station. bond men to find stem cell cures. jonathan thomas told me the $1.7 billion september to date built a dozen new laboratories. funded 1200 papers on curable diseases, and lured to california, 150 top scientists. backing the seven clinical trials, but the fda has not approved even one stem cell therapy. 6 months ago, the doctors got the okay to use a canadian treatment for dying children. >> it's really the new era of regenerative medicine. >> reporter: critics say it's not whwhat voters had hoped for >> when you have, for example the head of the stanford medical school
about a unique program for veterans that includes having them swim with dolphins in vallejo. johner john fowler is here to explain. >> reporter: animal therapy with what can be described as play. at six flags discovery kingdom a special team of dolphins swam with 10 traumatized combat veterans. this is a first of its kind therapy session, struggling war fighters connecting with these remarkable creatures. >> the feel and the touch of them. it's kind of life altering. i probably won't think about anything bad for a couple days now and won't have bad dreams thinking about this. >> reporter: people have had this experience say there's an emotional bond of trust with these highly social penalty animals. something these warriors could benefit from. >>hey need help. people have to realize what they've gone through. we have to help them. >> reporter: muir yell snyder swam with dolphins on her 90th birthday. she arranged this event. >> it helps them to get away from some of the tragedies they've experienced. >> reporter: former infantryman served three tours in iraq. >> i have a problem with tru
in our special report, john fowler on the alarm doctors are sounding. >> it's convenient say many young women. >> it's probably the most convenient place to put it education -- especially when you go out. you put one phone in your breast and your money in the other. >> it's really easy to feel when somebody texting you. you can grab it really fast. >> maybe they should talk to tiffany france. >> i put my cell phone right in my bra. >> reporter: her mother had misgivennings. >> we never took it seriously until she was diagnosed. >> reporter: tiffany got breast cancer at 21. >> it just so happened her tumors were exactly where her cell phone had been against her skin. her bare skin for about six years. >> reporter: no genetic or other risk factor, surgeons removed tiffany's left breast. >> it's kind of coincidental that it is right where i kept my cell phone. >> reporter: donna jens also got breast cancer at 39. the dot here are where her tumors grew. this imagine shows the tumors were just under the surface of her skin. >> all in this area right here. which is where i tucked my cell pho
to mobile phones. tonight in our special report, john fowler on the alarm doctors are sounding. >> it's convenient say many young women. >> it's probably the most convenient place to put it education -- especially when you go out. you put one phone in your breast and your money in the other. >> it's really easy to feel when somebody texting you. you can grab it really fast. >> maybe they should talk to tiffany france. >> i put my cell phone right in my bra. >> reporter: her mother had misgivennings. >> we never took it seriously until she was diagnosed. >> reporter: tiffany got breast cancer at 21. >> it just so happened her tumors were exactly where her cell phone had been against her skin. her bare skin for about six years. >> reporter: no genetic or other risk factor, surgeons removed tiffany's left breast. >> it's kind of coincidental that it is right where i kept my cell phone. >> reporter: donna jens also got breast cancer at 39. the dot here are where her tumors grew. this imagine shows the tumors were just under the surface of her skin. >> all in this area right here. which i
was back in capitol hill today exactly one week after he acknowledged an extramarital affair. as john fowler reports, lawmakers questioned the four star general about the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in libya. >> reporter: retired general petraeus apologized to lawmakers for his apair that led to his resignation last week. reveals a military culture of sexual corruption. >> i'm deeply, deeply disappointed in former general petraeus' actions. the jury is still out on what general allen did. but when it's happening at the top you know it's corrupting all the way down the chain. >> reporter: the investigation was questioning the attack in benghazi. specifically what the white house knew and when. >> it added to our ability to make judgments about what is clearly a failure of intelligence. >> in talking points to the un that the attacks were spontaneous. >> the key is if they were undocumenting talking points at a very early stage. >> reporter: lawmakers today said the original cia talking points refer to al-qaida as responsible that was somehow deleted. now congress wants to know
are on strike this evening here in the bay area. john fowler has a closeup look at the issues and what happens next. >> reporter: in just the last few minutes my sources have confirmed that sutter delta health center has actually already implemented some of those disputed contract provisions. that's angered some of these nurses here. although it is allowed by law, four nurses have lost their health benefits. they want hospitals to drop their demands for concessions. hospitals say emergency, surgery, and patient care remain normal with replacement nurses filling in. despite noisy protests health debates say 60% of scheduled nurses came to work. at biggest hospital summit a claimed 80% crossed the picket line. strikers say it's the principle. >> everything would have changed if we accept the take aways they have put on the table. >> reporter: no free healthcare for part timers, fewer sick days off and lower pay for new hires. given today's economics the offer is fair. >> that's really in line with police, fire, teachers. >> reporter: nurses struck 10 hospitals today. two in san jose. eight are s
special report tonight, new evolving viruses that are becoming more dangerous than ever. tonight john fowler shows us how local researchers are in a race against time to discover the mutations and protect the human race. >> reporter: it came from the sea an invisible mutant attacking marine mammals. one of the new crop of deadly viruses suddenly adapting to humans. >> that's the frightening part they're so good at it it makes it difficult for us. >> reporter: marine mammals say they have not yet detected this virus. this virus killed about 200 seals on the east coast last year. it's suspected in a current unexplained sale die off in the pacific northwest. it evolved from bird influenza virus. >> they're really good at adapts and changes over time. >> reporter: the virus can also attack human lungs. there are no confirmed cases yet and some aren't worried. >> don't end up being as serious as we were told they would be. >> reporter: with the ocean teaming with viruses most of which are completely unknown to science, it's hardly a surprise that this new one popped up. but we've learned t
john fowler shows us how local researchers are in a race against time to discover the mutations and protect the human race. >> reporter: it came from the sea an invisible mutant attacking marine mammals. one of the new crop of deadly viruses suddenly adapting to humans. >> that's the frightening part they're so good at it it makes it difficult for us. >> reporter: marine mammals say they have not yet detected this virus. this virus killed about 200 seals on the east coast last year. it's suspected in a current unexplained sale die off in the pacific northwest. it evolved from bird influenza virus. >> they're really good at adapts and changes over time. >> reporter: the virus can also attack human lungs. there are no confirmed cases yet and some aren't worried. >> don't end up being as serious as we were told they would be. >> reporter: with the ocean teaming with viruses most of which are completely unknown to science, it's hardly a surprise that this new one popped up. but we've learned that researchers almost daily are discovering new ways that nature is trying to infect us. >
three weeks. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> today r & b singer tre songs dawned an apron and hair net before his big performance tonight. the singer served food at the cross roads homeless shelter. also posed for pictures. >>> well it turns out thin is in this year when it comes to christmas trees. retailers say skinny trees are just as fashionable as skinny jeans these days. the trees run as tall as 12 feet. sam's club and home depot have these slim trees for sale and the market is anything but shrepder. last year people spent an estimated $1.7 billion on christmas trees -- anything but slender. >>> today is a different kind of black friday for hockey fans. the disappointing news from the nhl and what it means for one of hockey's marquee location. >>> and the news today about macho camacho and it's not good news. >>> and you can watch all of our newscasts live on your mobile device. map at bank of america, we're continuing to lend and invest in the people, businesses, and organizations that call the bay area home. whether it's helping a nonprofit p
as with anything, that a little common sense protects a lot of people. john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >> bald is beautiful and a prom sis meant to be kept as far as two cheerleaders are concerned. the indianapolis colts cheer leaders had their heads shaved in honor of head coach chuck pagano who has been gone most of this season battling leukemia. they promised to shave their heads if a campaign to raise money passed $10, and it raised nearly $23,000 -- $10,000, and it raised nearly $23,000. >>> a new study has found that 85 drugs may be dangerous when the user takes grapefruit juice. citrus fruits have an enzyme which breaks drugs down. so taking one tablet could be like taking five or 10 tablets with a glass of water. >>> nasa has announced the crew for it's 2015 space mission. the current record for an american is 215 days. kelly is the brother-in-law of congressman gabrielle give orders. >>> tonight one of the greatest movies of aim time is celebrating a milestone anniversary. >> you must remember this, a kiss is just a kiss. >>> casablanca was released 70 years ago today. the movie featu
factors, it has to be something else. john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we now know the name of the fourth person who died at a sacramento county nursing home after eating poisonous mushrooms. the sheriff's office identified the latest victim at 92-year- old dorothy heart. three other seniors died from the poisonous mushrooms. sheriff investigators say the caretaker who picked those mushrooms did not know they were poisonous. >>> b.a.r.t. officials are teaming up for a modernization. a new service would include additional cars and more frequent service which could accommodate 50% more riders. it's still unclear how the modernization would be funded. one possibility would be asking vote education -- voters for more money. >>> a project to turn the bay bridge into a art project is ongoing. >> to do this technically is while it's going to be elegant it takes a lot of work. a lot of coordination. >> the money for this art project comes from private donations of the $8 million needed, 2 million still need to be raised. >>> some residents in plumas county in the sierra fear that t
agencies. researchers say they have ruled out socio economic factors, it has to be something else. john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we now know the name of the fourth person who died at a sacramento county nursing home after eating poisonous mushrooms. the sheriff's office identified the latest victim at 92-year- old dorothy heart. three other seniors died from the poisonous mushrooms. sheriff investigators say the caretaker who picked those mushrooms did not know they were poisonous. >>> b.a.r.t. officials are teaming up for a modernization. a new service would include additional cars and more frequent service which could accommodate 50% more riders. it's still unclear how the modernization would be funded. one possibility would be asking vote education -- voters for more money. >>> a project to turn the bay bridge into a art project is ongoing. >> to do this technically is while it's going to be elegant it takes a lot of work. a lot of coordination. >> the money for this art project comes from private donations of the $8 million needed, 2 million still need to be raised. >>> some
fowler is in the news room tonight with what the general said and why we won't be hearing it. john. >> general petraeus testified during a dmraszed session of congress, a highly -charged appearance about libya and unlike previous trips to capitol hill, his wife did not accompany him. >> tight security surrounded closed-door sessions on capitol hill. retired general david petraeus apoll jiedz to lawmakers for his affair that led to his resignation last week. it's something san mateo congresswoman jackie speer today reveals a military culture of sexual corruption. >> i am deeply deeply disappointed in former general petraeus's actions. the jury is still out on what general allen did, but what is happening at the top, you know it's corrupting all the way down the chain. >> petraeus's testimony today focussed on the september 11th attack in benghazi, specifically what the cia and the white house knew and when. >> it added to our ability to make judgments about what is clearly a failure of intelligence. >> mccain and other republicans claiming un ambassador susan rice misled in talking
: for the record, that was senators john mccain and lindsey graham so the question is this grover norquist's last stand? here with an answer is donnie fowler. donnie of course, democratic strategist and great political operative. welcome back into "the war room." is it grover norquist's last stand? >> we can only hope. look, i think republicans should just say sign the pledge for the last election. not for this congress. it expired. there's only 39 of the 40 top senators and republicans -- six are freed. let his people go, grover. let your people go. >> jennifer: he ain't going to let them go. all of this is occurring in the context of the fiscal cliff negotiations and what lindsey graham was suggesting was that if you close some of the loopholes and deductions and revenue goes up, that's not raising taxes apparently grover norquist sees it differently but interestingly enough, there is a push then from the left as well and there are unions that have taken out ads to pressure democratic senators not to compromise. >> h
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